Archive for July, 2009

The Russian Word for Where

July 31st, 2009
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Power Phrases Lesson #10
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Here, there, everywhere! Huh? what.. where.. When studying a new language, it is important to get down the words that will enable you to function on a daily basis. The basic question words are always good to know, and a good place to start. Of course.. when you ask a question, you will need to be able to understand the answer… and we’ll get to that soon enough. For now let’s learn how to ask Where in Russian. What? no.. where…

Where in Russian flash card 1

Where in Russian flash card 1


Russian for Where Card 2

Russian for Where Card 2

Currency Exchange in Russian Video

July 30th, 2009
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Power Phrases Lesson #9
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If you need to exchange money when in Russia or Ukraine you won’t have any trouble at all if you can say the word for currency exchange in Russian. This is a two part post, the first video shows you how to remember the word, and the second video gives a little bit of Russian reading practice. Watch the video to learn how to exchange money in Russian.
By the way, be sure to bring crisp, new bills when you travel to either Russia or Ukraine. They are picky at the exchange booths and will often refuse to take a bill even if it just has a crease in it. Meanwhile, the money the give you in exchange, the local currency, I mean…it’s dirty, ripped, bent, folded, creased, written on, etc. What’s up with that?

This video shows you a sign that says currency exchange written in Russian. Have a look as it’s a good opportunity to get in a little bit of Russian sign reading practice.

Russian word for currency exchange card 1

Russian word for currency exchange card 1


How to say currency exchange in Russian card 2

How to say currency exchange in Russian card 2

How to say tea and coffee in Russian

July 30th, 2009
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Power Phrases Lesson #13
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In Russia tea and coffee is commonly offered when visiting people’s homes or when sitting down for a bite to eat at a local restaurant. Sure water is good, and a person can only drink so much juice.. but tea or coffee.. can’t get enough! This video teaches you how to easily remember the Russian word for tea and Coffee in Russian.

Tea in Russian flashcard side 1

Tea in Russian flashcard side 1


Tea in Russian flashcard side 2

Tea in Russian flashcard side 2

How to Say “Please” in Russian

July 30th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #7
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Today’s video lesson is about how to say please in Russian. Of course when visiting a country for the first or one-hundredth time, it’s always good to be polite. Instead of demanding a cup of tea or coffee when out for a bite, you’ll get better results by softening up your speaking style just a bit with a nicely placed “please”. On to todays Power Phrase video: How to say “Please” in Russian.

How do you say “I want” in Russian?

July 28th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #6
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This video shows you how to say “I want in Russian“. If you need a beer or some chicken, after watching this video you will be able to easily get both. The Russian word for I want is.. ya khachyu That doesn’t do you much good though, watch the video for the correct Russian pronunciation and how to remember this and other important Russian words.

How to ask How much in Russian?

July 28th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #5
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In this next video I show you how to say How Much in Russian, which is Сколько (Skoilko). Of course this is one of the most useful Russian phrases you can know. Don’t get caught short of money after a big purchase because you didn’t ask the proper questions. I’ll be putting up a post that will explain how to understand what you hear in Russian. Conversation is a two way street, so asking will get you places, but understanding is when the real magic starts to happen.

By the way, I hope you are making those flashcards. I can’t emphasize enough just how helpful they are. I mean, why just stand there idly in line at the grocery store? Take one of your cards out of your wallet (yes, I keep mine in my wallet. Don’t leave home without ‘em.) and test yourself. And remember, try not to cave in if you can’t remember a word right away. Give it time, and of course, try to recall the PowerPhrase we created.

If you can’t recall the Power Phrase, then give yourself just the first word. The point is that, the smaller the hint you give yourself, the more you’re forcing your brain to remember the answer. If you just read the answer, you’re not firing the correct neural pathways in your brain to facilitate learning. You can read an answer a hundred times, and STILL not remember it the next time you try to recall the word. It’s better to strain and struggle and sweat for ten minutes trying to remember first the PowerPhrase, which then helps you recall the actual word, than it is to just quit and say, “Let me take a look at the answer.” If you do that, it’ll take a whole lot longer to learn Russian.

Speaking of remembering, try — without glancing back at the top of this post — to recall what the word is for “How much.” Do you remember? What if I give you just the first letter? S____ . Does that help?

Or the first two: Sk___ ?

I know I’m getting into the real nitty-gritty of studying, but if you stick to my system, you will learn Russian much, much faster. The tip here is that if all else fails and you HAVE to read the answer, *just give yourself the first letter.* See if that’s enough to jog your memory.

Ok, that’s today’s post. Now take a minute and watch the video below to learn how to say How much in Russian.

How to say Hi in Russian

July 28th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #4
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If you want to say Hi in Russian look no further! In this video I teach you the Russian word for hi, which is privet. Remember as always to roll your R’s in Russian, including the R in privet. To get a feel for the rolled R, try saying the word udder, and note how your tongue bounces against the roof of your mouth. So, suuuuper slow, the pronunciation of Privet would be:

Puh-udder-ee-viyet. Say this faster and faster, and you will work the rolled Russian “R” into your speech naturally.

Be careful how you use Hello and Hi as it really does depend on who you are speaking to and what the situation is. Hi is the more casual version to be used when speaking with those who you are familiar with.

The Russian word for Hello, by the way, is relatively difficult to learn, so I put it much later in these videos. But don’t worry, we’ll get to it. For now, you can get by with just Privet, and even if you use it mistakenly (that is, during a formal first meeting with an adult), you won’t overly offend because they know you are a foreigner and they appreciate even the smallest effort to learn their language.

You’ll often hear people especially young women greet each other (and you) with Privetik! (The “ik” part is pronounced “eek,” but usually written as “ik.”) What that little “ik” at the end is doing is making it cutesy. In fancy lingo terms, it’s called the diminutive, but I tend to avoid using fancy terms like that.

Anyway, if you say that to a girl, I guarantee she’ll laugh and think it’s the cutest darned thing she’s ever heard a foreigner saying privetik! If you want, you can make lots of words cutesy like that. Sometimes you need to add just “ik” at the end, but sometimes it works better with “chik” (pronounced just like the word “cheek”). If, for example, you know that the word “poka” (pronounced puhKAH) means “See you later,” you can make the cutesy version for a big laugh:

Pokachik!

Or even cuter: Pokachikee!

Remember that in all instances the accent is on the KA syllable.

Want more? Da (which means Yes) could become Dachik, and nyet (No) could be nyetchik. Not that you’ll hear it very often. A little “chik” goes a long way. But using it once or twice when people — especially women — don’t expect it, you’ll get a big reaction.

Good Luck!

Russian Destroyer