Archive for July, 2009

Chicken in Russian | The Russian word for “chicken”

July 27th, 2009

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

Power Phrases Lesson #2
All Power Phrase Lessons | All Russian lesson audio & mp3 downloads

If you ever wanted to know the Russian word for Chicken, you’re in Luck! This is a good one to know as you can find chicken in most grocery stores in Russia. The word is pronounced Kooritsu. Check out the flash-cards and have a look at the video. Sorry, but it doesn’t teach how to say “extra crispy” maybe in another lesson…

Hello in Russian Video | How to Say Hello in Russian Video

July 24th, 2009

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

Power Phrases Lesson #16
All Power Phrase Lessons | All Russian lesson audio & mp3 downloads

Be careful with how you use Russian greetings. Hello in Russian is considered formal and should be used in polite situations with people you are not familiar with. For example, with your boss who you would want to speak to with some degree of respect, you would say Hello, and not Hi which is more casual. For that see the video lesson for Hi in Russian.

Russian for Hello is Zdra-wichyeh

In this video as usual you can also hear a native Russian speaker’s commentary on when Hello is used and when it should not be used. As always make your flash cards and practice a little bit each day and you’ll be speaking Russian in no time!

Russian is pretty tough. I mean, let’s not kid ourselves. It can be downright intimidating at times. But there’s two things I want to encourage you with.

#1: Don’t worry. I am here to help you. I enjoy teaching, and I especially enjoy teaching Russian. If I can do it, you can do it. And I’m going to show you every trick I came up with to master this killer language. So hang in there.

Besides, if you’ve seen all the videos up to this point, you already have a good, useful vocabulary that you should feel proud of. I guarantee you ALREADY KNOW MORE RUSSIAN than 99% of the tourists who travel there. You know how to politely ask for tea and coffee, or a beer or juice, pizza, salad, soup, chicken. You can ask where the currency exchange is, or the bathroom, and you can point to ANYTHING and ask for this one here, please. Of course after todays Russian video lesson, you will know the difference between Hello and Hi in Russian.

That’s pretty useful, and I hope you feel good about that. Heck, I feel proud of you,and we barely know each other!

#2: Though you might be a beginner in Russian, here’s an important point that so many native speakers of English overlook: YOU ARE AN OUTRIGHT, WORLD CLASS MASTER OF ENGLISH.

How so?

You, my friend, can have the news on in the family room as you cook dinner in the kitchen and still understand everything.

You can watch a movie where the actors speak lightning fast, slang-ridden jargon obscured beneath a loud soundtrack, explosions and whatnot and still get every word,including the meaning, the sarcasms, the jokes, the subtext. All of it.

Because you are a native speaker of English, and Russian people (for one) will constantly be amazed at your skills. They will ask you to listen to a song, maybe Britney Spears, maybe The Pussycat Dolls, and ask if you understand the words, and could you please explain it to them. You have an incredible skill, every bit as amazing as their ability to understand Russian.

Always remember that.

Now on to today’s video! How to say Hello in Russian.

Do svidaniyeh!

Mark

 
icon for podpress  How to say Hello in Russian: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

5 Phrases Russian Learners Must Know

July 14th, 2009

Thinking back to when I was just getting started, I thought it might be helpful for those who are wondering what Russian phrases to study first to have some guidance. Phrases Russian learners should know are listed below. Of course there are a bunch, but lets start with some phrases you can put to use right away.

1) MOZHnuh = May I?

Think of all the situations in life where you need to ask permission. Let’s say you’re in Moscow’s Sheremtevo airport, and you’re not sure if it’s your turn to go through security. You look at the guard, “MOZHnuh?” (”May I?”) and he’ll either wave you through or have you wait a moment. Past security, at the food stand, you point to a sandwich and ask, “MOZHnuh?” and the server will hand you a sandwich and ask you to pay. Then you point to an empty seat and and ask the person sitting adjacent, MOZHnuh?, and the person will either gesture for you to sit down, or wave you away. MOZHnuh is #1 on my list of must-know Russian phrases.

2) EezvihNEETyeh, vwee nee mozhetyeh minyeh poMOCH? = Excuse me, can you help me?

Though quite a mouthful, this is the best way to open a conversation if you’re seeking help or advice. If you are in a bind, this is a phrase Russian language enthusiasts really must know.

3) Da eelee nyet = Yes or no

This phrase should be used as a preface to most questions you’ll be asking during your first year or two of study. It must be asked apologetically and gently because it can be as rude in Russian as it is in English. Nevertheless, “Da eelee nyet” is vital because until you have all the appropriate vocabularly in place, you’re not likely to understand the answers you get to the questions you ask.

Imagine, for example, that you’re riding the Kiev subway. You ask someone, “Excuse me, can you help me? Is this Kreshatik Street?”

And here’s a typical response: “Oh, you’re looking for Kreshatik? That depends because there’s two exits on Kreshatik…Are you looking for the one near the central square, or…”

Believe me, this is a very handy Russian phrase you should study first.

This leads to…

4) Ya PLOkha paniMAIyu po-russki = I poorly understand Russian.

When the person you’re speaking with finishes their response — a long one which probably won’t be understood — you smile and tell them, “Ya PLOkha poniMAIyu po-russki.”

The person might respond by asking where you’re from, and here’s where you say, “Da eelee nyet…is this Kreshatik?” and hopefully the person (or someone standing nearby, listening in) will say, “Da, Kreshatik,” and you hop off the subway.

5) (location, building) Ftu storonu? = In this direction? [Pointing in the direction you're facing or walking.]

For example, “Hermitage ftu storonu?” = Is the Hermitage in this direction?

Hopefully they’ll answer Yes (Da) and you’ll continue on your way. If the answer is longer and you don’t understand, tell them “Ya PLOkha poniMAIyu po-russki.” (Phrase #4). Then gently say, “Da eelee nyet…Hermitage ftu storonu?”

Here’s a new conversation using these phrases. It is *very* typical of what happens in real life:

“EezvihNEETyeh, vwee nee mozhetyeh minyeh poMOCH? Metro (subway) ftu storonu?” = Excuse me, can you help me? Is the subway in this direction?

“Yes, although there’s one a bit closer if you go down that street two blocks and cross over to–”

(Interupting) “Eezvihneetyeh, ya PLOkha paniMAIyu po-russki. Da eelee nyet, metro ftu storonu?” = “I’m sorry, I poorly speak Russian. Yes or no, is the subway in this direction?” Since you opened very politely, you won’t offend by interupting and insisting on a yes or no answer.

“Da,” they’ll respond.

And you finish with “Spasiba!” (Thank you!)

Got it! Great. Hope you enjoyed the 5 phrases Russian language students should know! Maybe another video is in order.. Da?

Russian Shopping Mall | How to say Store/Shop in Russian

July 14th, 2009
Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

In this video blog post, I show you the inside of a Russian shopping mall. Technically it’s Ukrainian but.. we will be speaking to the locals in Russian of course. Watch closely as the women with the purple shopping bag go by. I make a reference to the bag being full of magazines, which is very close to the Russian word for shop. Watch the video, and easily learn and remember the russian word for shop. This video also teaches the Russian word for buy. So if you are in Russia and you need to buy something, and you want to find a shop to buy something in.. watch the video. If you have any questions about this video or anything else please leave a comment.

Thank You in Russian Video

July 13th, 2009

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

Power Phrases Lesson #3
All Power Phrase Lessons | All Russian lesson audio & mp3 downloads

Watch the video to learn how to say Thank You in Russian, then read a little bit about how I wound up doing what I’m doing…

One of my students asked me, once: What did it for you, Mark? Was it just the women that inspired you to really buckle down and study Russian?

My answer: I liken it to learning guitar.

Did I practice guitar for all that time just to impress girls? No. I was aware that girls often like musicians, so it was a factor, but I also just loved playing guitar. I think any musician would answer the same. And so it was for Russian. I was aware that even just muttering a few phrases like thank you or, where is the such and such, with my horrendous American accent even that got attention from Russian girls. But that wasn’t the main motivating factor. I really just liked the sound of it, and liked pronouncing it. In fact, I remember the exact sentence I heard where I said, That’s it! That was so cool! I am going to try to master this! It was this:

Миша, я хочу есть! Вон симпатичное место. По-моему здесь можно неплохо поесть, и тут не очень дорого.

Actually, I’m not positive if I’m remembering those first two sentences correctly, but that last one I’m more-or-less positive about. Man, six years later and I can still remember it! The lines are from a textbook and accompanying DVD I bought called LIVE FROM MOSCOW. A girl called Tanya is telling her boyfriend:

Misha, I want to eat. Over there is a nice place. I think here it’s possible to have a good meal, and it’s not expensive.

The way the words flowed, the sound of her voice. I played it over and over.

I doubt you are going to fall in love with the way I pronounce any of these Russian words, but I do hope the language grows on you. If it has, and you’re wanting to supplement my videos with another source, I recommend trying to find the FREE course Princeton University released on the web. I used to to have it, but when my hard drive crashed two years ago, it was lost (with a whole lot of other stuff.)

But it’s out there. If you can’t find it, let me know and I’ll get it from one of my students who has it. It’s free, it’s all digital, with textbook and audio files — and it’s excellent.

Ok, on to today’s video: Thank you in Russian

Cheers from Sevastopol,

Mark

How to use a Russian Cell Phone

July 12th, 2009

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

In Russia everybody has a cell phone. Young people, older people, they’re everywhere (cell phones that is..). If you are headed to Russia or Ukraine getting a cell phone is easy but there are some things you need to know.
In this video I show you everything you need to know to get and use a Russian cell phone, check out the vid. Cheers, Mark.

Russian Power Phrases Series Audio and Mp3’s

July 12th, 2009

Russian Power Phrases Series Introduction
#1 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#2 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#3 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#4 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#5 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#5a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#6 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#7 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#7a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#8 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#9 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#10 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#11 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#12 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#13 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#14 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#14a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#14b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#15 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#15a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#15b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#16 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#16a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#16b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#17 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#17a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#18 Part 1 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#18 Part 2 Power Phrases Audio mp3
#18a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#19 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#19a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#20 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#20a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#21 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#21a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#22 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#22a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#22b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#23 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#23a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#24 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#24a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#24b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#25 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#25a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#25b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#26 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#26a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#26b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#27 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#27a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#27b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#28 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#28a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#28b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#29 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#29a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#29b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#29c -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#30 Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#30a -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
#30b -review- Russian Power Phrases Audio mp3
– Final Review –