Posts Tagged ‘how to say’

Russian for Excuse Me

August 17th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #25
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The word ‘izvineetyeh’ (which can be spelled numerous ways in English) is used in the same situations as ‘Excuse me‘ is in English. So, when you sneeze, you’d say ‘izvineetye.’ Stopping someone of the street for directions? ‘Izvihneetye, pozhaluista.’ But it’s more broad than the English version, covering situations where we’re apt to say “I’m sorry.” (or nowadays, people more and more are using the colloquial “My bad.”). Accidentallly step on someone’s toes? Ask forgiveness with ‘oi, izvineetye’. Walk into a room where your presence wasn’t expected, ‘Oi, izvineetye pozhaluista.’

Russian, of course, has two ways of addressing people, either formally or informally. This version of excuse me is formal because of that last little ‘tyeh’ at the end of the word. But if you’re with a good friend, you wouldn’t want to be so formal. It’d be like saying “Excuse me, Sir,” if you stepped on your buddy’s foot. So, to make the informal version, just say: ‘izvinee.’

Izvineetyeh, gotta run!

21a Review how do I say

August 17th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #21a
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This is a review lesson for How do I say ___ in Russian? Please make sure you spend a little bit of time with the review lessons, as they really do help to make things sink in.

Currency Exchange in Russian Video

July 30th, 2009
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Power Phrases Lesson #9
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If you need to exchange money when in Russia or Ukraine you won’t have any trouble at all if you can say the word for currency exchange in Russian. This is a two part post, the first video shows you how to remember the word, and the second video gives a little bit of Russian reading practice. Watch the video to learn how to exchange money in Russian.
By the way, be sure to bring crisp, new bills when you travel to either Russia or Ukraine. They are picky at the exchange booths and will often refuse to take a bill even if it just has a crease in it. Meanwhile, the money the give you in exchange, the local currency, I mean…it’s dirty, ripped, bent, folded, creased, written on, etc. What’s up with that?

This video shows you a sign that says currency exchange written in Russian. Have a look as it’s a good opportunity to get in a little bit of Russian sign reading practice.

Russian word for currency exchange card 1

Russian word for currency exchange card 1


How to say currency exchange in Russian card 2

How to say currency exchange in Russian card 2

How to say Hi in Russian

July 28th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #4
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If you want to say Hi in Russian look no further! In this video I teach you the Russian word for hi, which is privet. Remember as always to roll your R’s in Russian, including the R in privet. To get a feel for the rolled R, try saying the word udder, and note how your tongue bounces against the roof of your mouth. So, suuuuper slow, the pronunciation of Privet would be:

Puh-udder-ee-viyet. Say this faster and faster, and you will work the rolled Russian “R” into your speech naturally.

Be careful how you use Hello and Hi as it really does depend on who you are speaking to and what the situation is. Hi is the more casual version to be used when speaking with those who you are familiar with.

The Russian word for Hello, by the way, is relatively difficult to learn, so I put it much later in these videos. But don’t worry, we’ll get to it. For now, you can get by with just Privet, and even if you use it mistakenly (that is, during a formal first meeting with an adult), you won’t overly offend because they know you are a foreigner and they appreciate even the smallest effort to learn their language.

You’ll often hear people especially young women greet each other (and you) with Privetik! (The “ik” part is pronounced “eek,” but usually written as “ik.”) What that little “ik” at the end is doing is making it cutesy. In fancy lingo terms, it’s called the diminutive, but I tend to avoid using fancy terms like that.

Anyway, if you say that to a girl, I guarantee she’ll laugh and think it’s the cutest darned thing she’s ever heard a foreigner saying privetik! If you want, you can make lots of words cutesy like that. Sometimes you need to add just “ik” at the end, but sometimes it works better with “chik” (pronounced just like the word “cheek”). If, for example, you know that the word “poka” (pronounced puhKAH) means “See you later,” you can make the cutesy version for a big laugh:

Pokachik!

Or even cuter: Pokachikee!

Remember that in all instances the accent is on the KA syllable.

Want more? Da (which means Yes) could become Dachik, and nyet (No) could be nyetchik. Not that you’ll hear it very often. A little “chik” goes a long way. But using it once or twice when people — especially women — don’t expect it, you’ll get a big reaction.

Good Luck!

Russian Destroyer

Hello in Russian Video | How to Say Hello in Russian Video

July 24th, 2009

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Power Phrases Lesson #16
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Be careful with how you use Russian greetings. Hello in Russian is considered formal and should be used in polite situations with people you are not familiar with. For example, with your boss who you would want to speak to with some degree of respect, you would say Hello, and not Hi which is more casual. For that see the video lesson for Hi in Russian.

Russian for Hello is Zdra-wichyeh

In this video as usual you can also hear a native Russian speaker’s commentary on when Hello is used and when it should not be used. As always make your flash cards and practice a little bit each day and you’ll be speaking Russian in no time!

Russian is pretty tough. I mean, let’s not kid ourselves. It can be downright intimidating at times. But there’s two things I want to encourage you with.

#1: Don’t worry. I am here to help you. I enjoy teaching, and I especially enjoy teaching Russian. If I can do it, you can do it. And I’m going to show you every trick I came up with to master this killer language. So hang in there.

Besides, if you’ve seen all the videos up to this point, you already have a good, useful vocabulary that you should feel proud of. I guarantee you ALREADY KNOW MORE RUSSIAN than 99% of the tourists who travel there. You know how to politely ask for tea and coffee, or a beer or juice, pizza, salad, soup, chicken. You can ask where the currency exchange is, or the bathroom, and you can point to ANYTHING and ask for this one here, please. Of course after todays Russian video lesson, you will know the difference between Hello and Hi in Russian.

That’s pretty useful, and I hope you feel good about that. Heck, I feel proud of you,and we barely know each other!

#2: Though you might be a beginner in Russian, here’s an important point that so many native speakers of English overlook: YOU ARE AN OUTRIGHT, WORLD CLASS MASTER OF ENGLISH.

How so?

You, my friend, can have the news on in the family room as you cook dinner in the kitchen and still understand everything.

You can watch a movie where the actors speak lightning fast, slang-ridden jargon obscured beneath a loud soundtrack, explosions and whatnot and still get every word,including the meaning, the sarcasms, the jokes, the subtext. All of it.

Because you are a native speaker of English, and Russian people (for one) will constantly be amazed at your skills. They will ask you to listen to a song, maybe Britney Spears, maybe The Pussycat Dolls, and ask if you understand the words, and could you please explain it to them. You have an incredible skill, every bit as amazing as their ability to understand Russian.

Always remember that.

Now on to today’s video! How to say Hello in Russian.

Do svidaniyeh!

Mark

 
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